Il Salto – The Leap

Il Salto – The Leap

L. Lavone is proud to release the first photos of our inaugural equestrian scarf, “Il Salto,” The Leap. The limited quantity, exclusive “Il Salto” design was skillfully created by Julie Freund for L. Lavone. The vibrant scarf is an Italian-made 90cm x 90cm silk scarf that will beautifully packaged in a distinctive L.Lavone box. The first scarves will ship November 2014, arriving in stores just in time for holiday sales. Julie Freund is an accomplished artist and an equestrian herself, she has a particular talent of portraying the English sport horse, and earlier this year her artwork was chosen as the design for the esteemed Hampton Classic Horse Show’s official poster. Designing a wearable piece of art was a new experience for Freund, but it was one that she enjoyed immensely. “It’s always great to be able to see your work go beyond just an image on the canvas,” Freund said. “It was a process to combine the traditional medium into a digital work of art to be used for fashion. For this design, I worked in many layers, just as I do in painting. However, because it was on the computer, I had more of an opportunity to play around with composition and color.” L.Lavone believes that a simple scarf can transform an entire outfit or become a lasting keepsake cherished for years to come. That is the philosophy of company owner Michelle Cavanaugh Donn “Equestrian themed scarves are iconic. That is why I decided silk scarves would be our first product.” Donn said, adding that she can’t wait to start wearing her company’s first creation, “The soft...
The Beauty of Silk Screening a Scarf

The Beauty of Silk Screening a Scarf

Silk screening is a method for printing that was first developed in China during the Song Dynasty around 1000 AD it spread across Asia and finally found wide acceptance in Europe in the 18th century when the silk mesh needed in the process became readily available there. Silk Screening has a number of advantages over the newer digital printing processes when working on heavier silk twill as is customary for scarves. Because the dye is pressed into the material to be colored it will be absorbed into the fabric allowing the dye to color both the front and back sides of the silk scarf. Thus you can tie your scarf with less of a visible difference between the front and back than if the scarf had been created using the digital process. The silk screening process is a great deal of work with each color in a scarf having to be printed individually using a screen created just for that color layer. The colors are layered on with the smallest details printed first then working to up the biggest such as the background and border colors. A complex scarf could easily need twelve or more screens and some as many as thirty or more. Once the colors are all applied and the dye set the scarf needs to have the edges finished. Each side is hand rolled and stitched taking as long as forty minutes for a seamstress to complete the hem on one silk scarf. Creating a scarf this way is far more time consuming and expensive then the digital printing option, but the luster and vibrancy makes...